After its online parties and DJ sets brought huge commercial success, the company is now preparing to launch its first ever festival next month Six months ago Sherelle was ready to quit music for good, focus on the day job and give up the idea of being a professional DJ. Then her Boiler Room set happened. Fewer than 100 people were invited to see the 26-year-old play a studio in Hackney, but millions watched online; Sherelle went viral. The jungle and footwork music specialist is now one of the most talked about talents in club culture: two agents, her own record label, and a residency on BBC Radio 1 have followed. “I amassed thousands of followers overnight,” she told the Observer. “Some of them were DJs and producers who I love and respected for years. My mind was blown.” Boiler Room’s founder, 34-year-old Blaise Bellville, describes his company as “an independent music platform and cultural curator”, one that connects underground club culture to fans worldwide via the internet. The premise is simple: Boiler Room organise a wildly oversubscribed party, film the DJ playing a live set and then broadcast it online. More than two million people have subscribed to the YouTube chann...